Thank an Oakland Public Worker Today

New Lakeshore Newsracks

I know it’s not fashionable these days to praise public workers, but I just have to do it anyway. Given layoffs, attrition, and furlough days, city employees are working harder than ever before.

A trio of folks from the Community Economic Development Agency performed a small miracle in our Lakeshore shopping district just in time for the 24thAnnual Easter Parade and Derby (hat) Decorating Contest. For years a group of us who care about our neighborhood shopping centers (I am the Director of the Lakeshore Business Improvement District), had been trying to get our city-installed newsracks cleaned up and downsized. The City had passed an ordinance but could not implement it without the agreement and assistance of all the news organizations themselves.

Lakeshore getting ready for the parade

It was a coordination nightmare and often seemed hopeless. No sooner would the City get a company to fix their broken-into box, than another one would be broken into. During that period the print news and advertising business shrank and ever more racks became abandoned. Additionally, every person with an ad or a cause continues to use them to stick up their posters then leaves them to disintegrate. The racks, which were installed to solve the problem of a jumble of unsightly boxes, got tagged and battered until they became a blight and a danger on the sidewalks.

Under the leadership of Bill Quesada, a planner with the Organization and Infrastructure section of CEDA with the assistance of Keith Pacheco and Ken Gunari, both Specialty Inspectors, an agreement was hammered out to remove the dangerous or unsightly racks while reducing the number over all and developing a maintenance plan.

The news racks on Lakeshore and Grand Avenue were reduced or moved (to more convenient locations that don’t block pedestrian access) and cleaned up just in time for our annual parade. We hope the media distribution guys can keep up with the taggers and posters and that most folks will think again before creating new blight. If you see a stand-alone box, often dirty plastic, and unsightly, those are not legal and can be reported to the City for eventual removal (following a noticing process).

So that’s the Community and Economic Development Department. I want to send out a hearty thank you to the Public Works guys and gals also. Recently I had to call them because some of the strands on our necklace of lights were not in sync and lighting at the wrong time, and they responded quickly and cheerfully, as they always do.

I can’t thank these public workers enough. From the garbage lockout of recent years (when city workers had to empty our street cans) to the mowing of the grass on the Mandana Green, yes, sometimes the work has to get on a list and wait its turn; but they always come through and not just on Lakeshore.

When I worked at the now-closed Edward Shands Adult School, (did I mention, it’s completely closed down now, no more students in East Oakland can get help there-just checking that you saw that) we had a problem with a crack house on an adjoining property. It was truly awful for the students, the staff, and the neighborhood. The police would close it down and someone would break it open again. The landlord was not very responsive.

Once again, city workers stepped in. They fenced off the driveway and building entrance, painted over the graffiti, and prevented an easy return of the criminals. We all breathed a sigh of relief and carried on with teaching and learning until, of course, the state cut off our funding and we abandoned the school and the students.

I meant this just to be a letter of thanks to Bill Quesada and his co-workers but I really hope it makes us all rethink our attitudes towards those who serve us in government. I read a note on our neighborhood listerve the other day in which the writer stated that he could not support the small parcel tax that the Mayor and most of the City Council are requesting, but the writer implied he would support a bond for our deteriorating streets.

I share that neighbor’s concern over the state of our potholes, as they could be rightly called rather than streets, but I’m not sure I would put streets, roads, and cars above all other concerns in our city, knowing the needs of our young folks and seniors as I do.

Let’s pass the small, $80 parcel tax so that the everyday and not-so-everyday things that our city’s workers do for us can continue to be done, albeit in an even more reduced capacity. Don’t kid yourselves that this is not as big a catastrophe as Loma Prieta and the Oakland firestorm put together. The difference is then; we got lots of help from the federal and state governments. But this time, no one is coming to save us.

At town halls and other meetings, our new Mayor has asserted that she is determined not to abandon our seniors, or our libraries, or our parks. I hope we won’t abandon them either.

Young Parade goer gazes warily at the Easter Bunny